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Martyred for the Gospel

Martyred for the Gospel
The burning of Tharchbishop of Cant. D. Tho. Cranmer in the town dich at Oxford, with his hand first thrust into the fyre, wherwith he subscribed before. [Click on the picture to see Cranmer's last words.]

Collect of the Day

The Fifth Sunday after the Epiphany.
The Collect.

O LORD, we beseech thee to keep thy Church and household continually in thy true religion; that they who do lean only upon the hope of thy heavenly grace may evermore be defended by thy mighty power; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Daily Bible Verse

Monday, October 19, 2009

Justification by Faith Alone Versus Justification by Faith Plus Works

This is the central issue of the Reformation. Reformation 101. Justification is a fiat once-for-all declaration that occurs the moment someone first believes. We are accounted as righteous not because of anything or any change that occurs within us, or, that we are by any means actually righteous, but are accounted as righteous because of Christ’s righteousness (His active and passive obedience, i.e., His life) imputed to us.





The following is a comment from an article, "Fiducial Joksters," by Sean Gerety at the God's Hammer blog:


We can see exactly what the pope means by “justification” and why he says “faith alone is true” provided it is definitionally related to charity and the works of love. According to Razinger, it is through faith that we are “conformed to Christ” and it is this process that ultimately justifies us before the throne of God. The problem should be obvious and what Razinger attributes to justification Luther rightly attributes to sanctification. This is the central issue of the Reformation. Reformation 101. Justification is a fiat once-for-all declaration that occurs the moment someone first believes. We are accounted as righteous not because of anything or any change that occurs within us, or, that we are by any means actually righteous, but are accounted as righteous because of Christ’s righteousness (His active and passive obedience, i.e., His life) imputed to us. By contrast, sanctification is an ongoing process that occurs throughout a believers life whereby we are being formed by the work of the Spirit more and more into the likeness of Christ as we mortify the work of the flesh and grow in personal or subjective righteousness. However, sanctification contributes absolutely nothing to our justification. While sanctification naturally follows or flows from justification, the two doctrines are necessarily and logically distinct. It’s absurd that anyone would ever think God’s work in us could ever satisfy God’s absolute standard of justice apart from us as long as the stain of sin remains. Purgatory isn’t going to help anyone either. The ongoing transformation that occurs as the result of our progressive sanctification is something that is never perfected in this life (Methodists notwithstanding), is wrought with sin even in the seemingly most sanctified sinner (see 1 Tim 1:15, Romans 7), and, again, contributes absolutely nothing to our justification before the bar of God’s justice. That’s why it should be no surprise that the pope appeals to Galatians 5:6 in support of Rome’s scheme of justification. It is the faith that works through love and not faith alone that justifies.



In other words, Rome's view is justification by works since even "love" is a work.


Charlie

1 comment:

aaytch said...

Charlie. Justification by faith alone is discoverable long before the Reformation. Those that recite the Nicene Creed and believe otherwise (works) do so deceitfully.

In the Creed, the plan of salvation (a.k.a. Jesus Christ) is begotten before all worlds. It is then expressed in our world by the "remission of sins". It is then established in the life of the believer by Baptism. Then comes the Resurrection and the "life of the world to come".

No intervening steps. All done by God.

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