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Martyred for the Gospel

Martyred for the Gospel
The burning of Tharchbishop of Cant. D. Tho. Cranmer in the town dich at Oxford, with his hand first thrust into the fyre, wherwith he subscribed before. [Click on the picture to see Cranmer's last words.]

Collect of the Day

The Second Sunday in Lent.

The Collect


ALMIGHTY God, who seest that we have no power of ourselves to help ourselves; Keep us both outwardly in our bodies, and inwardly in our souls; that we may be defended from all adversities which may happen to the body, and from all evil thoughts which may assault and hurt the soul; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

The Collect from the First Day of Lent is to be read every day in Lent after the Collect appointed for the Day.

Daily Bible Verse

Tuesday, January 11, 2011

Cracks in the Crystal Cathedral - Why we are better off letting God make the gospel relevant.

…Schuller was tapping into themes of the human potential movement, the rage in the 1960s and '70s, when Abraham Maslow's theories deemed self-actualization the highest expression of human life. Schuller put a biblical and theological spin on it all and, as a result, attracted many to faith in Christ. --Christianity Today editorial...


I have to wonder how people are brought to "faith in Christ" when the message has been perverted? If the problem folks have is merely self-esteem issues and not that they are born guilty of Adam's original sin and they are guilty of their own actual sins, then there is no need for God to be reconciled to them and there is no need for God's wrath against them to be appeased or satisfied. In fact, the substitutionary atonement of Christ for the elect would be completely irrelevant if we believe Schuller's false gospel of self-esteem.

Ironically, the dictionary definition of "self-esteem" reveals the narcissistic element of the word:

self-es·teem
   /ˈsɛlfɪˈstim, ˌsɛlf-/ Show Spelled[self-i-steem, self-] Show IPA
–noun
1.
a realistic respect for or favorable impression of oneself; self-respect.
2.
an inordinately or exaggeratedly favorable impression of oneself.
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Origin:
1650–60

—Synonyms
See pride.

—Antonyms
diffidence. From: Dictionary.Com


Cracks in the Crystal Cathedral - Why we are better off letting God make the gospel relevant.

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