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Martyred for the Gospel

Martyred for the Gospel
The burning of Tharchbishop of Cant. D. Tho. Cranmer in the town dich at Oxford, with his hand first thrust into the fyre, wherwith he subscribed before. [Click on the picture to see Cranmer's last words.]

Collect of the Day

The Fifth Sunday after the Epiphany.
The Collect.

O LORD, we beseech thee to keep thy Church and household continually in thy true religion; that they who do lean only upon the hope of thy heavenly grace may evermore be defended by thy mighty power; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Daily Bible Verse

Sunday, December 04, 2011

Bishop Ed Malcomb Suffers Heart Attack

The following prayer request was sent to me by Phil Veitch of the Reformation Anglicanism blog:


Friends:
 
Bishop Ed Malcomb, Church of England (cont') suffered a major heart attack last week, fell, hit his head on the floor, but, though hospitalized, is past the major coronary issues for the present.  However, there are apparent memory issues associated with the head trauma.  His ability to resume episcopal responsibilities is unspecified at this point.  As a commendable brother in Christ, especially as an Anglican brother, he warrants our prayers.
 
Bp. Malcomb steered clear of support of USA Anglican continuers--astutely--since he knew little about them, their history, and given that CoE (cont') had substantial restraints in supporting, financially or episcopally, anything in the USA...he refused to support organizationally anything in America.  It was a wise, sober, careful, restricted, and honest evaluation.  He didn't understand Americans.  He had no ability to oversee Americans.  He had little money for involvement with Americans. He was involved with supporting the few congregations in England still associated with Confessional and 1662 Prayer Book Churchmanship. He was careful.
 
Bp. Malcomb--in his 80s--was and is a third-generation deep CoE cleric.  That counts for something.  He has stories.  Bp. Malcomb's grandfather, again, a cleric, fought strenuously against the 1928 British Book of Common Prayer.  An effort strenuously advocated by Anglo-Catholics in England.  What did Americans know though?  The memories of that fight are not well recorded.  Bp.  Malcomb...vis a vis his grandfather and father...was well acquainted with Tractarian-Ritualism of the ate 19th-early 20th century in England, unlike Americans.  The Brits have always been more sophisticated than the Americans about Tractationisms. One needs to be a Gideonite-warrior.
 
Nuff said.  The old Master is not well and he warrants our concerns and prayers. Given my experience with (REC) Bishops, exhibits in favour of Presbyterianism and Synodical government, as well as an irremediable distrust and suspicion of Bishops (sorry, Bp. Ogles), this honourable Churchman is commended to your prayers.
 
We commend Bp. Malcomb to your prayers.  He reminds me of another saint, Bp. Theophilus Herter, REC, from a better day. An impoverished reflection, but it captures my last week with Bp. Herter.  http://reformationanglicanism.blogspot.com/2011/11/advent-2-2011-memories-worth.html
Bp, or Dr,. Herter with an earned doctorate of depth and gold, a tremendous Master.  And then...there was Dr. Philip Edcumbe Hughes, another Anglican Prof for two years, but I must end.  Nuff said, an old Master is ill.
 
Also, as an aside, Dr. Gillis Harp, an American historian, may be involved in an American iteration of the Church Society.  Time will tell.
 
Regards to all,

Donald Philip Veitch
 


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Reasonable Christian Blog Glory be to the Father, and to the Son : and to the Holy Ghost; Answer. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be : world without end. Amen. 1662 Book of Common Prayer

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