>

Martyred for the Gospel

Martyred for the Gospel
The burning of Tharchbishop of Cant. D. Tho. Cranmer in the town dich at Oxford, with his hand first thrust into the fyre, wherwith he subscribed before. [Click on the picture to see Cranmer's last words.]

Collect of the Day

The Fifth Sunday after the Epiphany.
The Collect.

O LORD, we beseech thee to keep thy Church and household continually in thy true religion; that they who do lean only upon the hope of thy heavenly grace may evermore be defended by thy mighty power; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Daily Bible Verse

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Is It Wrong for Christians to Argue? Quote of the Day: Dr. Gordon H. Clark


“But when they did not find them, they dragged Jason and some brethren to the rulers of the city, crying out, “These who have turned the world upside down have come here too.” (Acts 17:6, NKJV) 


In his commentary on the book of Philippians, Dr. Clark said the following in reference to Philippians 1:16, 17, 18:



Verse 16 continues the sentence in verse 15.  [Philippians 1:15, 16].  Those who had been emboldened to preach publicly were divided into two groups.  Some preached from good motives; some did not.  The former loved both Paul and the Gospel.  They knew and were inspired by the fact that Paul was completely devoted to the defense of the Gospel.
The word for defense is apologia: in technical theology, apologetics.  Some misguided Christians today repudiate argumentation.  The New Testament does not.  Not only is apologia in 1 Peter 3:15; it is also in Acts 22:1, 1 Corinthians 9:3, 2 Corinthians 7:11, and Philippians 1:7, as we recently saw.  Mark 9:10 has the disciples "questioning one with another" (suzeteo)--they were acting properly.  In Mark 12:28 a scribe had heard Jesus arguing with the Sadducees.  Acts 6:9 has some people disputing with Stephen and clearly Stephen disputed with them, as 6:10 [Acts 6:10] very forcefully indicates.  Barnabus in Acts 9:29 defends the recently converted Paul by telling the suspicious disciples that Paul disputed against the Grecians.  Well, these verses should be enough to silence those who think that a Christian should not argue.
 Dr. Gordon H. Clark.  Philippians.  (Hobbs:  The Trinity Foundation, 1996).  Page 28.
 See also:  Philippians.

For liberals and those who promote ecumenical reunion above Scriptural truth, arguing and polemics are the unforgivable sin for Christian fellowship.  But the reality is that those who are teaching heresy or those who contend out of selfish ambition are the ones who are creating the divisions.  The faith once delivered to the saints is to be "earnestly" contended for.  (Jude 1:3).

No comments:

Support Reasonable Christian Ministries with your generous donation.