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Martyred for the Gospel

Martyred for the Gospel
The burning of Tharchbishop of Cant. D. Tho. Cranmer in the town dich at Oxford, with his hand first thrust into the fyre, wherwith he subscribed before. [Click on the picture to see Cranmer's last words.]

Collect of the Day

The Fifth Sunday after the Epiphany.
The Collect.

O LORD, we beseech thee to keep thy Church and household continually in thy true religion; that they who do lean only upon the hope of thy heavenly grace may evermore be defended by thy mighty power; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Daily Bible Verse

Sunday, August 25, 2013

Calvin's Calvinism: Quote of the Day: God Is Absolutely Sovereign



"If those clothe God with the garment of a tyrant, who refer the hardening of men even to His eternal counsel, we most certainly are not the originators of this doctrine. If they do God an injury who set His will above all other causes, Paul taught this doctrine long before us. Let these enemies of God, then, dispute the matter with the apostle. For I maintain nothing, in the present discussion, but what I declare is taught by him."  -- John Calvin

The following is a quote from John Calvin in Calvin's Calvinism, A Treatise of the Eternal Predestination of God, Section I.  Calvin's opponent is Pighius, a man who openly attacked the sovereignty of God and accused the Calvinist view of making God into a tyrant.   Here is Calvin's response:

Let us, however, be fully assured that the apostle, in the first place, here curbs with becoming gravity the licentious madness of these men, who make nothing of attacking openly the justice of God; and that, in the next place, he gives to the worshippers of God a more useful counsel of moderation, than if he had taught them to soar on eagles' wings above the forbidden clouds. For that soberness of mind which, regulated by the fear of God, keeps itself within the bounds of comprehension prescribed by Him, is far better than all human wisdom. Let proud men revile this sobriety if they will, calling it ignorance. But let this sober-mindedness ever hold fast that which is the height of all true wisdom; that by holding the will of God to be the highest rule of righteousness, we ascribe to Him His own proper and peculiar glory.

But Pighius and his fellows are not hereby satisfied. For, pretending a great concern for the honour of God, they bark at us, as imputing to Him a cruelty utterly foreign to His nature. Pighius denies that he has any contest with God. What cause, or whose cause is it, then, that Paul maintains? After he had adopted the above axiom "that God hardens whom He will and has mercy on whom He will" he subjoins the supposed taunt of a wicked reasoner: "Why doth He yet find fault? For who hath resisted His will?" (Rom. ix. 19.) He meets such blasphemy as this by simply setting against it the power of God. If those clothe God with the garment of a tyrant, who refer the hardening of men even to His eternal counsel, we most certainly are not the originators of this doctrine. If they do God an injury who set His will above all other causes, Paul taught this doctrine long before us. Let these enemies of God, then, dispute the matter with the apostle. For I maintain nothing, in the present discussion, but what I declare is taught by him. About these barking dogs, however, I would not be very anxious. I am the rather moved with an anxiety about some otherwise good men, who, while they fear lest they should ascribe to God anything unworthy of His goodness, really seem to be horror-struck at that which He declares, by the apostle, concerning Himself.

Now, we are holding fast, all the while, a godly purpose of vindicating the justice of God from all calumny. And the modesty of these timid ones would be worthy of all praise, if it were not the offspring of moroseness, inflated with a certain secret pride. For such men speak according to their own natural sense and understanding. But why do they fear to concede to the power of God that which is beyond the power of their own mind to comprehend, lest His justice should be endangered? Why, I say, is this? It is because they presume to subject the tribunal of God to their own judgment. Now Paul shows us that it is an act of intolerable pride in any man to assume to himself the judgment of his brother, because there is one Judge by whom we all stand or fall, and to whom every knee must bow. What madness is it, then, for a man to raise his crest against this only Judge Himself, and to presume to measure His infinite power by natural sense!

6 comments:

Brandon R. Burdette said...

Check out these criticisms Charlie:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L8eq7D_SHDs

Charlie J. Ray said...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L8eq7D_SHDs

Charlie J. Ray said...

Roger Olson will not post my responses on his blog. He has no answer for me. He will talk to Mike Horton and even has a book with Horton. But there reason for that is Horton is not a polemicist or an apologist. Horton simply lets the man spew countless irrational and illogical statements without giving an adequate response. Basically, Van Tilians are ill equipped to respond to irrationalists because they are irrationalists themselves! Roger Olson makes God a finite god who can do nothing about evil.

Gordon H. Clark has responded to the idea that God is finite in his book, God and Evil: The Problem Solved. The answer is really simple. It's so simple that even a plow boy can understand the answer. Basically, God is in ultimate control of evil. Isaiah 45:7 and Amos 3:6. If God is finite, then he is unable to prevent evil. And if a good God is finite and cannot do anything about evil, it might just as well be that a finite God is not good but is evil and cannot do anything to prevent good. It's a form of dualism.

Clark's answer, however, is that God is the ultimate cause of both good and evil. God is subject to no law, not even the invented laws of Arminians and of Open Theists who try to force God to obey their human conceptions of what they think God should do. The difference is obvious to anyone, however. The law is made for man. God, being God, is subject to no law. And even less is God to be judged by mere men.

Charlie J. Ray said...

But if our unrighteousness demonstrates the righteousness of God, what shall we say? Is God unjust who inflicts wrath? (I speak as a man.) 6 Certainly not! For then how will God judge the world? 7 For if the truth of God has increased through my lie to His glory, why am I also still judged as a sinner? 8 And why not say, "Let us do evil that good may come "?-- as we are slanderously reported and as some affirm that we say. Their condemnation is just. (Romans 3:5-8 NKJ)

Charlie J. Ray said...

Therefore He has mercy on whom He wills, and whom He wills He hardens. 19 You will say to me then, "Why does He still find fault? For who has resisted His will?" 20 But indeed, O man, who are you to reply against God? Will the thing formed say to him who formed it, "Why have you made me like this?" 21 Does not the potter have power over the clay, from the same lump to make one vessel for honor and another for dishonor? 22 What if God, wanting to show His wrath and to make His power known, endured with much longsuffering the vessels of wrath prepared for destruction, 23 and that He might make known the riches of His glory on the vessels of mercy, which He had prepared beforehand for glory, 24 even us whom He called, not of the Jews only, but also of the Gentiles? (Romans 9:18-24 NKJ)

Brandon R. Burdette said...

Yes, I've seen footage of Olson and Horton in a 'debate'. Looked more like a friendly tea-party to me, with laughter and a passive vibe.

Olson himself is the objector in Romans 9, shaking his fist at his Creator, asking all those questions against God.

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